Bowhunting: Mule Deer Shot at 102 Yards with a Mathews Bow #deerhunting

Bowhunting: Mule Deer Shot at 102 Yards with a Mathews Bow #deerhunting whitetail deer hunting blog

Ok, so this post may get some people talking. When it comes to bowhunting, it’s typically about getting as close as you can to the deer. But out West, bowhunters practice and get opportunities to shoot deer at much longer ranges than most East coast or Mid-West folks do.

In this case, my friend Dave did just that.

“I shot it in Wyoming during 2010 archery deer season with a Rage 3 blade and Mathews Switchback bow set at 70 pounds. He was initially at 80 yards but moved out to 102 while my brother and I got caught up talking about the best way to stack pins on my sight.

I told my brother that if we could get closer, I would try and throw an arrow at him. Well, that’s as close as we could get out on the prairie. The arrow broke his shoulder bone hit the heart and was lodged in the opposite shoulder.

It is all about confidence in your equipment and your ability practice, practice, practice.”

Would you have taken the shot?

Bowhunting: Mule Deer Shot at 102 Yards with a Mathews Bow #deerhunting whitetail deer hunting blog

Tomorrow after work, Dave and I will be doing a long range test…..on video. That should be interesting.

What’s the longest distance you ever shot at or killed a deer with your bow?

Bowhunting: Mule Deer Shot at 102 Yards with a Mathews Bow #deerhunting whitetail deer hunting blog

About huntography

Hi, I'm Rudy and I'm Filming America's Whitetail Deer and Elk Bow Hunters, One at a time. You could be in our next documentary hunting film. Email me to learn more.

2 comments
Sole Adventure
Sole Adventure

There are a LOT of factors that come into play when talking about long range distances.  There are several reasons that guys out West take longer shots.  The typical reasons have to do with terrain, limited opportunities, and the nature of spot and stalk hunting.  One big reason that long range shots can work well out West has nothing do with the location or the shooter, but rather the animal.  In the case of Elk you are obviously dealing with a much larger target and vital zone.  In the case of Mule Deer you also have their behavior on your side (as compared to Whitetail).  Now don't get me wrong, Mule Deer can be very sensitive and skiddish, but not near the level that your typical Whitetail deer is.  Mule Deer tend to have a curiosity which can get them in trouble.

Shooting 100 yards in your back yard is one thing, shooting it in the field is another.  There are many factors that need to be assessed... exact yardage, wind conditions, animal alertness, shooter confidence, etc.

Sole Adventure
Sole Adventure like.author.displayName 1 Like

There are a LOT of factors that come into play when talking about long range distances.  There are several reasons that guys out West take longer shots.  The typical reasons have to do with terrain, limited opportunities, and the nature of spot and stalk hunting.  One big reason that long range shots can work well out West has nothing do with the location or the shooter, but rather the animal.  In the case of Elk you are obviously dealing with a much larger target and vital zone.  In the case of Mule Deer you also have their behavior on your side (as compared to Whitetail).  Now don't get me wrong, Mule Deer can be very sensitive and skiddish, but not near the level that your typical Whitetail deer is.  Mule Deer tend to have a curiosity which can get them in trouble. Shooting 100 yards in your back yard is one thing, shooting it in the field is another.  There are many factors that need to be assessed... exact yardage, wind conditions, animal alertness, shooter confidence, etc.